South Sudan Timeline for Elections

South Sudan Timeline: a history of dialogue and peace processes.

  1. Future date?
  2. 2018
  3. 2017
  4. 2015
  5. 2012
  6. 2011
  7. 2010
  8. 2005
  1. First National Elections – Poll: When should we have elections?
  2. National Dialogue Peace Conference
  3. Birth of National Dialogue
  4. Arusha Intra-SPLM Dialogue Summit
  5. Addis Ababa Cooperation Agreement
  6. Independence for South Sudan!
  7. Southern Sudanese Parties Convention
  8. Autonomous government formed

23 thoughts on “South Sudan Timeline for Elections

  1. Jeniso Olako

    There should be elections in 2018. It will be absurd to amend the current constitution to extend the life-term of this current government. The power must now be returned back to the people of south Sudan. The more the National Assembly continuous extending the mandate of the current government without voting in either a referendum or through elections, the more unpopular the government will become. Extension is not the interest of South Sudanese but the interest of the government due to the war they dragged themselves into since 2013. Citizens want a say in their affairs. Enough is enough.

  2. Deng Mayak

    I agree, there should be elections in 2018. Maybe end of 2018. But how is elctions if there is no security At least 50% of the country should make an elections. Do you know?

  3. Anonymous

    i do agree for South Sudan as a Country to have election in 2018 but wen we improve insecurity, the most important thing is to have a peaceful instability and to have a better standard of living to they citizens all over the 32 states with no insecurity in the country. How can we have election in South Sudan in 2018 while 1.5 Million people are in they Refugees camp in the neighbor countries? how will the candidate do their campaign while the whole country is under insecurity? no road map in the country, the extension of the election is not the interest of South Sudanese or (Citizens) but the interest of the government due to the war they dragged themselves into since 2013. Citizens want a say in their affairs. Enough is enough.
    however, how shall we manage to fund election in 2018 whereas the Government had failed to pay civil servants salary for the good number of months. At the moment i think election is not the solution per now, we really need to stop insecurity which is the big matter or concern per now in our country. we really need to have one family, one common goal, one struggle. To have a election in the country it mean we should had a peaceful mind to address our citizens on what are our future plan. To run for presidential mean a lot to the educated community or country, You need to have mandatory what you will do for the citizens if you win election and what are your previously achievement but what we have per now?

  4. Junub Adik

    All senior government officials plus the army should dialogue among themselves because they are the ones who messed this country up. They all know where they went wrong not the masses

  5. Garang L.

    National Dialogue committee should make a dialogue with J1 people; because J1 people messed up this country. Dialogue with masses would not bear any fruits because their recommendations would not be acccepted by J1 group.

    Because I feel that national Dialogue is another project to waste public funds

  6. Anonymous

    We want it 2018

  7. Machar

    Everyone need election to be held in 2018 but who will vote for candidates since citizens have deserted the country for two reasons; War and Economic crisis.
    I would personally vote if the current leadership in Government and in Opposition is change or if both of them bring an end to the suffering and lasting peace to the people of South Sudan.

    Thanks

    Machar

  8. Henry Momwa

    WE are not prepared for the election yet. Three quarters of south Sudanese are in refugee camps in the neighboring countries, who will vote in the said election? Please stop the war and repatriate the refugees back home and then will talk of elections.

  9. Eastern

    Elections in 2018? Are those leading South Sudan having their priorities right really? Forcing legitemacy by way of conducting shoddy election is another way of creating new reasons for new wars. Let Kiir accept the reality by making a life concession: dialogue with his sworne enemies but not friends to establish a caretaker government at the end of which members of such a government SHALL NOT PARTICIPATE IN ANY ELECTIVE POLITICS OF SOUTH SUDAN….

  10. Anonymus

    Why you are the only people who says not 2018? You are supporter of Kiir who dont want any elections any time. because every ones knows you cant wait. you have to have elections end 2018 it’s never happen. why you want wait? wait to 2030???

  11. majak

    the election will be conducting in which show to the world that South Sudan is democaracy Country, however the time very limited just some fews weeks to the end of 2017.
    the Citizen are expected the government put more resources in election process.

  12. majak

    let us starting preparation now and than between May and June 2018 the election will kick off

  13. Eastern

    Not any time soon. South Sudan needs to stabilise and heal itself rather than plung the country into further turmoil following a rushed and poorly prepared election in this tense political environment…

  14. Acuil Malith Banggol

    I wish all sociopolitical entities could join South Sudan National Dialogue to share their views and to listed to others. Then we should translated the National Dialogue goals into guiding principles where each entity in South Sudan sign to honor and abide. Then we agree on the Constitution that abides us. Every entity must abide by article 4 of SSTC 2011 mandating
    Defence of the Constitution

    4. (1) No person or group of persons shall take or retain control of State power except in accordance with this Constitution.

    (2) Any person or group of persons who attempts to overthrow the constitutional government, or suspend or abrogate this Constitution commits treason.

    (3) Every citizen shall have the duty to resist any person or group of persons seeking to overthrow the constitutional government, or suspend or abrogate this Constitution.

    (4) All levels of government shall promote public awareness of this Constitution by translating it into national languages and disseminating it as widely as possible. They shall provide for the teaching of this Constitution in all public and private educational and training institutions as well as in the armed and other regular forces, by regularly transmitting and publishing programmes in respect thereof through the media and press.

    Then we should have opportunity to acquire legitimacy through BALLOT NOT BULLET!

  15. yok kek nguan

    yok kek nguan south sudan president

  16. kek yok

    yok kek nguan South Sudan president

  17. Yok Kek Nguan

    South Sudan President 2018
    Yok Kek Nguan

  18. yok kek nguan

    South Sudan president 2018
    Yok Kek Nguan

  19. yok kek nguan

    President of the Republic of South Sudan yok kek nguan

  20. yok kek nguan

    udan
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to navigationJump to search
    Republic of South Sudan
    Flag of South Sudan
    Flag
    Coat of arms of South Sudan
    Coat of arms
    Motto: “Justice, Liberty, Prosperity”
    Anthem: “South Sudan Oyee!”

    MENU0:00
    South Sudan (orthographic projection).svg
    Location of South Sudan
    Capital
    and largest city Juba
    04°51′N 31°36′E
    Official languages English[1][2]
    Recognised national languages
    Bari Dinka Luo Murle Nuer Zande
    and around 60 other languages
    [note 1]
    Demonym South Sudanese
    Government Federation[4] under a presidential constitutional republic
    • President
    Yok Kek Nguan
    • Vice President
    Paul Mowein Ajang
    • First Vice President
    Taban Deng Gai
    Legislature National Legislature
    • Upper house
    Council of States
    • Lower house
    National Legislative Assembly
    Establishment
    • End of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
    1 January 1956
    • Comprehensive Peace Agreement
    6 January 2005
    • Autonomy
    9 July 2005
    • Independence from Sudan
    9 July 2011
    • United Nations admission
    13 July 2011
    Area
    • Total
    619,745 km2 (239,285 sq mi) (41st)
    Population
    • 2016 estimate
    12,230,730[5]
    • 2008 census
    8,260,490 (disputed)[6] (94th)
    • Density
    13.33/km2 (34.5/sq mi) (214th)
    GDP (PPP) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $20.038 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $1,525[7]
    GDP (nominal) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $3.618 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $275[7]
    Gini (2009) 45.5[8]
    medium
    HDI (2015) Decrease 0.418[9]
    low · 181st
    Currency South Sudanese pound (SSP)
    Time zone East Africa Time (UTC+3)
    Drives on the right
    Calling code +211[10]
    ISO 3166 code SS
    Internet TLD .ss[11]a
    Registered, but not yet operational.

    The ten states of South Sudan grouped in the three historical provinces of the Sudan.
    Bahr el Ghazal
    Equatoria
    Greater Upper Nile
    South Sudan is a country in Africa. Its official name is the Republic of South Sudan.[12] It used to be a part of Sudan. A civil war began in 2013.

    The landlocked country is bordered by Ethiopia to the east; Kenya to the southeast; Uganda to the south; the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the southwest; the Central African Republic to the west; and the Republic of Sudan to the north. South Sudan includes the vast swamp region of the Sudd formed by the White Nile, locally called the Bahr al Jabal.

    History
    What is now South Sudan was once part of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. This part of the British Empire became the Republic of Sudan when independence was achieved in 1956. After the First Sudanese Civil War, the Southern Sudan Autonomous Region was formed in 1972 and lasted until 1983. A second Sudanese civil war soon developed and ended with the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005. Later that year, the Autonomous Government of Southern Sudan was formed. South Sudan became an independent state on 9 July 2011 at midnight local time,[13][14] after a referendum held in January 2011. In the referendum, nearly 99% of voters wanted to separate from the rest of Sudan.[15]

    The United Nations Security Council met on 13 July 2011 to formally discuss membership for the Republic of South Sudan. The next day, 14 July 2011, South Sudan became a United Nations member state.[16][17] South Sudan has also applied to join the Commonwealth of Nations,[18] the East African Community,[19][20] the Intergovernmental Authority on Development,[21] the International Monetary Fund,[22] and the World Bank.[23] The country was declared eligible to apply for membership in the Arab League as well.[24]

    At the 2012 Summer Olympics, one athlete from South Sudan competed under the flag of the International Olympic Committee.[25] In 2013 a civil war broke out.

    Geography
    Its capital is Juba. Between eight and twelve million people live there. Over 200 languages are spoken, but the official language is English. Arabic is also spoken by many people.

    The main religion is Christianity, practised by nearly 78% of the population. Another 20% practise African traditional religions, and just 3% are Muslim.

    Much of South Sudan’s economy is based on oil, but they also have a large lumber industry mainly consisting of teak. It is a very poor and under-developed country. There is very little infrastructure, and the civil wars have caused a lot of damage.

    References
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011”. Government of South Sudan. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011. Part One, 6(2). “English shall be the official working language in the Republic of South Sudan”.
    “At a Glance”. Official portal. Government of Southern Sudan. 12 July 2011. Archived from the original on 28 June 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011” (PDF). Government of South Sudan. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
    “S. Sudanese government agrees to federal system with rebels – Sudan Tribune: Plural news and views on Sudan”. Sudan Tribune. Addis Ababa. 27 September 2014.
    “World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision”. ESA.UN.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 10 September 2017.
    “Discontent over Sudan census”. News24.com. AFP. 21 May 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan”. World Economic Outlook Database. International Monetary Fund.
    “Gini Index”. World Bank. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
    “2016 Human Development Report” (PDF). United Nations Development Programme. 2016. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
    International Telecommunication Union (14 July 2011). “New country, new number: Country code 211 officially assigned to South Sudan”. Press release. Retrieved 20 July 2011.
    “.ss Domain Delegation Data”. Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. ICANN. Retrieved 1 September 2011.
    “South Sudan”. The World Factbook. CIA. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-14.
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 1)
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 2)
    Fick, Maggie (30 January 2011). “Over 99 pct in Southern Sudan vote for secession”. USA Today. Retrieved 30 January 2011.
    Worsnip, Patrick (14 July 2011). “South Sudan admitted to U.N. as 193rd member”. Reuters. Retrieved 2011-07-24.
    “UN welcomes South Sudan as 193rd Member State”. United Nations News Service. 14 July 2011. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan launches bid to join Commonwealth”. Talk of Sudan. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “South Sudan: Big trading potential for EAC”. IGIHE. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “Welcome South Sudan to EAC!”. East African Business Week. 10 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan avails new foreign policy, to open 54 embassies”. Sudan Tribune. 25 July 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
    “IMF receives membership application from South Sudan, seeks contributions to Technical Assistance Trust Fund to help new country”. International Monetary Fund. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “World Bank group congratulates people of South Sudan on independence”. The Financial. 9 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan “entitled to join Arab League””. Sudan Tribune. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 8 July 2011.
    “London 2012: Refugee runs for world, family walk 50km to watch,” NDTV (New Delhi Television), 11 August 2012; retrieved 2012-8-16.
    Notes

    The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, Part One, 6(1): “All indigenous languages of South Sudan are national languages and shall be respected, developed and promoted”.[3]
    [hide]
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    Categories: SudanSouth Sudan2011 establishmentsLeast developed countries21st century establishments in Africa
    Navigation menu

  21. yok kek nguan

    South Sudan
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to navigationJump to search
    Republic of South Sudan
    Flag of South Sudan
    Flag
    Coat of arms of South Sudan
    Coat of arms
    Motto: “Justice, Liberty, Prosperity”
    Anthem: “South Sudan Oyee!”

    MENU0:00
    South Sudan (orthographic projection).svg
    Location of South Sudan
    Capital
    and largest city Juba
    04°51′N 31°36′E
    Official languages English[1][2]
    Recognised national languages
    Bari Dinka Luo Murle Nuer Zande
    and around 60 other languages
    [note 1]
    Demonym South Sudanese
    Government Federation[4] under a presidential constitutional republic
    • President
    Yok Kek Nguan
    • Vice President
    Paul Mowein Ajang
    • First Vice President
    Taban Deng Gai
    Legislature National Legislature
    • Upper house
    Council of States
    • Lower house
    National Legislative Assembly
    Establishment
    • End of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
    1 January 1956
    • Comprehensive Peace Agreement
    6 January 2005
    • Autonomy
    9 July 2005
    • Independence from Sudan
    9 July 2011
    • United Nations admission
    13 July 2011
    Area
    • Total
    619,745 km2 (239,285 sq mi) (41st)
    Population
    • 2016 estimate
    12,230,730[5]
    • 2008 census
    8,260,490 (disputed)[6] (94th)
    • Density
    13.33/km2 (34.5/sq mi) (214th)
    GDP (PPP) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $20.038 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $1,525[7]
    GDP (nominal) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $3.618 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $275[7]
    Gini (2009) 45.5[8]
    medium
    HDI (2015) Decrease 0.418[9]
    low · 181st
    Currency South Sudanese pound (SSP)
    Time zone East Africa Time (UTC+3)
    Drives on the right
    Calling code +211[10]
    ISO 3166 code SS
    Internet TLD .ss[11]a
    Registered, but not yet operational.

    The ten states of South Sudan grouped in the three historical provinces of the Sudan.
    Bahr el Ghazal
    Equatoria
    Greater Upper Nile
    South Sudan is a country in Africa. Its official name is the Republic of South Sudan.[12] It used to be a part of Sudan. A civil war began in 2013.

    The landlocked country is bordered by Ethiopia to the east; Kenya to the southeast; Uganda to the south; the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the southwest; the Central African Republic to the west; and the Republic of Sudan to the north. South Sudan includes the vast swamp region of the Sudd formed by the White Nile, locally called the Bahr al Jabal.

    History
    What is now South Sudan was once part of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. This part of the British Empire became the Republic of Sudan when independence was achieved in 1956. After the First Sudanese Civil War, the Southern Sudan Autonomous Region was formed in 1972 and lasted until 1983. A second Sudanese civil war soon developed and ended with the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005. Later that year, the Autonomous Government of Southern Sudan was formed. South Sudan became an independent state on 9 July 2011 at midnight local time,[13][14] after a referendum held in January 2011. In the referendum, nearly 99% of voters wanted to separate from the rest of Sudan.[15]

    The United Nations Security Council met on 13 July 2011 to formally discuss membership for the Republic of South Sudan. The next day, 14 July 2011, South Sudan became a United Nations member state.[16][17] South Sudan has also applied to join the Commonwealth of Nations,[18] the East African Community,[19][20] the Intergovernmental Authority on Development,[21] the International Monetary Fund,[22] and the World Bank.[23] The country was declared eligible to apply for membership in the Arab League as well.[24]

    At the 2012 Summer Olympics, one athlete from South Sudan competed under the flag of the International Olympic Committee.[25] In 2013 a civil war broke out.

    Geography
    Its capital is Juba. Between eight and twelve million people live there. Over 200 languages are spoken, but the official language is English. Arabic is also spoken by many people.

    The main religion is Christianity, practised by nearly 78% of the population. Another 20% practise African traditional religions, and just 3% are Muslim.

    Much of South Sudan’s economy is based on oil, but they also have a large lumber industry mainly consisting of teak. It is a very poor and under-developed country. There is very little infrastructure, and the civil wars have caused a lot of damage.

    References
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011”. Government of South Sudan. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011. Part One, 6(2). “English shall be the official working language in the Republic of South Sudan”.
    “At a Glance”. Official portal. Government of Southern Sudan. 12 July 2011. Archived from the original on 28 June 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011” (PDF). Government of South Sudan. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
    “S. Sudanese government agrees to federal system with rebels – Sudan Tribune: Plural news and views on Sudan”. Sudan Tribune. Addis Ababa. 27 September 2014.
    “World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision”. ESA.UN.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 10 September 2017.
    “Discontent over Sudan census”. News24.com. AFP. 21 May 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan”. World Economic Outlook Database. International Monetary Fund.
    “Gini Index”. World Bank. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
    “2016 Human Development Report” (PDF). United Nations Development Programme. 2016. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
    International Telecommunication Union (14 July 2011). “New country, new number: Country code 211 officially assigned to South Sudan”. Press release. Retrieved 20 July 2011.
    “.ss Domain Delegation Data”. Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. ICANN. Retrieved 1 September 2011.
    “South Sudan”. The World Factbook. CIA. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-14.
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 1)
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 2)
    Fick, Maggie (30 January 2011). “Over 99 pct in Southern Sudan vote for secession”. USA Today. Retrieved 30 January 2011.
    Worsnip, Patrick (14 July 2011). “South Sudan admitted to U.N. as 193rd member”. Reuters. Retrieved 2011-07-24.
    “UN welcomes South Sudan as 193rd Member State”. United Nations News Service. 14 July 2011. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan launches bid to join Commonwealth”. Talk of Sudan. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “South Sudan: Big trading potential for EAC”. IGIHE. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “Welcome South Sudan to EAC!”. East African Business Week. 10 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan avails new foreign policy, to open 54 embassies”. Sudan Tribune. 25 July 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
    “IMF receives membership application from South Sudan, seeks contributions to Technical Assistance Trust Fund to help new country”. International Monetary Fund. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “World Bank group congratulates people of South Sudan on independence”. The Financial. 9 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan “entitled to join Arab League””. Sudan Tribune. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 8 July 2011.
    “London 2012: Refugee runs for world, family walk 50km to watch,” NDTV (New Delhi Television), 11 August 2012; retrieved 2012-8-16.
    Notes

    The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, Part One, 6(1): “All indigenous languages of South Sudan are national languages and shall be respected, developed and promoted”.[3]
    [hide]
    Countries and territories of Africa
    Independent
    Algeria • Angola • Benin • Botswana • Burkina Faso • Burundi • Cameroon • Cape Verde • Central African Republic • Chad • Comoros • Democratic Republic of the Congo • Republic of the Congo • Côte d’Ivoire • Djibouti • Egypt • Equatorial Guinea • Eritrea • Ethiopia • Gabon • The Gambia • Ghana • Guinea • Guinea-Bissau • Kenya • Lesotho • Liberia • Libya • Madagascar • Malawi • Mali • Mauritania • Mauritius • Morocco • Mozambique • Namibia • Niger • Nigeria • Rwanda • São Tomé and Príncipe • Senegal • Seychelles • Sierra Leone • Somalia • Somaliland • South Africa • South Sudan • Sudan • Swaziland • Tanzania • Togo • Tunisia • Uganda • Zambia • Zimbabwe
    Governed by
    other countries
    Canary Islands • Ceuta and Melilla • Madeira Islands • Mayotte • Réunion • Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha • Western Sahara
    Categories: SudanSouth Sudan2011 establishmentsLeast developed countries21st century establishments in Africa
    Navigation menu
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  22. sstv@post.com

    South Sudan
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to navigationJump to search
    Republic of South Sudan
    Flag of South Sudan
    Flag
    Coat of arms of South Sudan
    Coat of arms
    Motto: “Justice, Liberty, Prosperity”
    Anthem: “South Sudan Oyee!”

    MENU0:00
    South Sudan (orthographic projection).svg
    Location of South Sudan
    Capital
    and largest city Juba
    04°51′N 31°36′E
    Official languages English[1][2]
    Recognised national languages
    Bari Dinka Luo Murle Nuer Zande
    and around 60 other languages
    [note 1]
    Demonym South Sudanese
    Government Federation[4] under a presidential constitutional republic
    • President
    Yok Kek Nguan
    • Vice President
    Paul Mowein Ajang
    • First Vice President
    Taban Deng Gai
    Legislature National Legislature
    • Upper house
    Council of States
    • Lower house
    National Legislative Assembly
    Establishment
    • End of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
    1 January 1956
    • Comprehensive Peace Agreement
    6 January 2005
    • Autonomy
    9 July 2005
    • Independence from Sudan
    9 July 2011
    • United Nations admission
    13 July 2011
    Area
    • Total
    619,745 km2 (239,285 sq mi) (41st)
    Population
    • 2016 estimate
    12,230,730[5]
    • 2008 census
    8,260,490 (disputed)[6] (94th)
    • Density
    13.33/km2 (34.5/sq mi) (214th)
    GDP (PPP) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $20.038 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $1,525[7]
    GDP (nominal) 2017 estimate
    • Total
    $3.618 billion[7]
    • Per capita
    $275[7]
    Gini (2009) 45.5[8]
    medium
    HDI (2015) Decrease 0.418[9]
    low · 181st
    Currency South Sudanese pound (SSP)
    Time zone East Africa Time (UTC+3)
    Drives on the right
    Calling code +211[10]
    ISO 3166 code SS
    Internet TLD .ss[11]a
    Registered, but not yet operational.

    The ten states of South Sudan grouped in the three historical provinces of the Sudan.
    Bahr el Ghazal
    Equatoria
    Greater Upper Nile
    South Sudan is a country in Africa. Its official name is the Republic of South Sudan.[12] It used to be a part of Sudan. A civil war began in 2013.

    The landlocked country is bordered by Ethiopia to the east; Kenya to the southeast; Uganda to the south; the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the southwest; the Central African Republic to the west; and the Republic of Sudan to the north. South Sudan includes the vast swamp region of the Sudd formed by the White Nile, locally called the Bahr al Jabal.

    History
    What is now South Sudan was once part of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. This part of the British Empire became the Republic of Sudan when independence was achieved in 1956. After the First Sudanese Civil War, the Southern Sudan Autonomous Region was formed in 1972 and lasted until 1983. A second Sudanese civil war soon developed and ended with the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005. Later that year, the Autonomous Government of Southern Sudan was formed. South Sudan became an independent state on 9 July 2011 at midnight local time,[13][14] after a referendum held in January 2011. In the referendum, nearly 99% of voters wanted to separate from the rest of Sudan.[15]

    The United Nations Security Council met on 13 July 2011 to formally discuss membership for the Republic of South Sudan. The next day, 14 July 2011, South Sudan became a United Nations member state.[16][17] South Sudan has also applied to join the Commonwealth of Nations,[18] the East African Community,[19][20] the Intergovernmental Authority on Development,[21] the International Monetary Fund,[22] and the World Bank.[23] The country was declared eligible to apply for membership in the Arab League as well.[24]

    At the 2012 Summer Olympics, one athlete from South Sudan competed under the flag of the International Olympic Committee.[25] In 2013 a civil war broke out.

    Geography
    Its capital is Juba. Between eight and twelve million people live there. Over 200 languages are spoken, but the official language is English. Arabic is also spoken by many people.

    The main religion is Christianity, practised by nearly 78% of the population. Another 20% practise African traditional religions, and just 3% are Muslim.

    Much of South Sudan’s economy is based on oil, but they also have a large lumber industry mainly consisting of teak. It is a very poor and under-developed country. There is very little infrastructure, and the civil wars have caused a lot of damage.

    References
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011”. Government of South Sudan. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011. Part One, 6(2). “English shall be the official working language in the Republic of South Sudan”.
    “At a Glance”. Official portal. Government of Southern Sudan. 12 July 2011. Archived from the original on 28 June 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
    “The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011” (PDF). Government of South Sudan. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
    “S. Sudanese government agrees to federal system with rebels – Sudan Tribune: Plural news and views on Sudan”. Sudan Tribune. Addis Ababa. 27 September 2014.
    “World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision”. ESA.UN.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 10 September 2017.
    “Discontent over Sudan census”. News24.com. AFP. 21 May 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan”. World Economic Outlook Database. International Monetary Fund.
    “Gini Index”. World Bank. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
    “2016 Human Development Report” (PDF). United Nations Development Programme. 2016. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
    International Telecommunication Union (14 July 2011). “New country, new number: Country code 211 officially assigned to South Sudan”. Press release. Retrieved 20 July 2011.
    “.ss Domain Delegation Data”. Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. ICANN. Retrieved 1 September 2011.
    “South Sudan”. The World Factbook. CIA. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-14.
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 1)
    Broadcast of Declaration of Independence (part 2)
    Fick, Maggie (30 January 2011). “Over 99 pct in Southern Sudan vote for secession”. USA Today. Retrieved 30 January 2011.
    Worsnip, Patrick (14 July 2011). “South Sudan admitted to U.N. as 193rd member”. Reuters. Retrieved 2011-07-24.
    “UN welcomes South Sudan as 193rd Member State”. United Nations News Service. 14 July 2011. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
    “South Sudan launches bid to join Commonwealth”. Talk of Sudan. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “South Sudan: Big trading potential for EAC”. IGIHE. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2011.
    “Welcome South Sudan to EAC!”. East African Business Week. 10 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan avails new foreign policy, to open 54 embassies”. Sudan Tribune. 25 July 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
    “IMF receives membership application from South Sudan, seeks contributions to Technical Assistance Trust Fund to help new country”. International Monetary Fund. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “World Bank group congratulates people of South Sudan on independence”. The Financial. 9 July 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
    “South Sudan “entitled to join Arab League””. Sudan Tribune. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 8 July 2011.
    “London 2012: Refugee runs for world, family walk 50km to watch,” NDTV (New Delhi Television), 11 August 2012; retrieved 2012-8-16.
    Notes

    The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, Part One, 6(1): “All indigenous languages of South Sudan are national languages and shall be respected, developed and promoted”.[3]
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